Active Travel Malahide

Enabling residents to safely walk or cycle to local amenities

We’re fortunate to live or work in Malahide – it’s a wonderful place. We want to make it even better, by enabling residents to safely walk or cycle to local amenities, including schools, clubs and shops.

To progress this, we set up an Active Travel Sub Committee in 2020 to examine how Government Policy on Active Travel* can best be applied for the benefit of everyone who lives and works in Malahide. Active Travel is defined in the Government Active Travel Policy as travelling with purpose using your own energy to get to work, shop or school. Generally, this means travelling by foot or bike.

Photo Anna Groniecka Photography

We identified 4 priority routes that we want the council to provide/improve in order to enable kids to safely bike or walk to school:

  1. Seapark Hill to Seamount Road (footpath) –
    Critical part of safe route to Malahide Community School (MCS)
  2. Caves Marsh Boardwalk – Safe route from Seabury to Pope John Paul II (walk / bike route)
  3. New bridge over the railway into the back of Malahide Community School – safe route connecting to Malahide Demesne via Ashwood Hall. (walk / bike route)
  4. Swords Road (R106) – Waterside to Malahide Castle (to allow for children from Waterside to get to PJP2 safely & for people from Malahide to get to the Educate Together High School safely) (walk / bike route) 

While progress to date has been slow (detailed in our monthly notes), we expect this to accelerate rapidly over the next few years, based on Active Travel initiatives announced last year (2020) and especially those announced on 11th Feb this this year (2021):

Active Travel announcements – 2021

Active Travel announcements – 2020

What do we expect in 2021:

  • FCC to hold a public consultation on Sutton To Malahide cycle route (March 2021)
  • FCC to progress the Swords to Seabury cycle route along the inner Broadmeadow estuary (EUR1,000,000 was allocated in Sep 2020)
  • NTA will provide FCC with updated cycle network plan for Fingal
  • We hope to have a deputation meeting with FCC to discuss our proposals (deferred since May 2020 due pandemic)
  • We will inform residents of and seek their input to proposed Active Travel routes

What are we asking for?
We believe that cycle routes should concentrate on providing safe routes to schools, clubs, shops parks and other community facilities, physically separated from motor vehicles whenever possible. We believe that priority should be given to pedestrians with adequate pavement space and crossing facilities. We believe pedestrians need proper pavement space and sufficient crossing facilities, separate to other road users including bicycles with prioritisation where there is conflict with other road users.

What does safe walking and cycling infrastructure look like:

  • Segregated / protected from motor traffic where possible
  • Segregated pedestrian and cycle infrastructure where possible
  • Minimum width / Desired width of footpaths and cycle paths
  • Pedestrian priority on “Share with care paths” – e.g. as currently in Malahide Castle
*Active Travel is travelling with purpose using your own energy to get to work , shop or school. *https://www.gov. ie/en/campaigns/d96bd-active-travel 
  
Link to Malahide Community Forum Active Travel https://malahidecommunityforum.ie/2021/01/13/would-you-like-your-kids-to-be-able-to-cycle-safely-to-school/

Posted in Active Travel, Community, Cycle paths, Environment, Family, Family bike rides, Footpaths, Pedestrians, School Children, Schools, Transport, Walks, Youth | 1 Comment

Latest Notes


Here are the notes for January 2021.

The notes of our previous meetings are available on our monthly notes page.

Posted in Active Travel, Footpaths, Monthly Notes & Newsletter, Planning, Transport, Walks | 1 Comment

Malahide Looped Walks – 9. Malahide Beach

Click to view route details: See: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=1hpM3dIXkwlcFpRTdx2bUOPLs4acCY55q&usp=sharing

Welcome to the Malahide Beach walk, which is the ninth in our series of looped walks. See all Malahide Looped Walks.

This 4k walk provides wonderful views of Lambay island which change every day with the light and the weather.

The walk starts at the Village Green in Malahide village centre, beautifully revamped in 2020. It immediately heads east along the coast walk behind the tennis club towards Malahide Beach.

Revamped Village Green – Start walk at the large open space
View from start point of the walk at the Village Green

Walk past the tennis club along the coast path. Join the beach at the slipway opposite the entrance to the Old Golf Links. Continue East along the beach for about 300 metres to the ramp that leads from the grassy park to the beach. Walk around the small headland of dunes, remaining on dry sand (above the water line). Then relax and enjoy your stroll on the main part of the beach for approx 600 metres.

Sun rising over Lambay from Malahide Beach
View to the East along Malahide beach

Return towards the village along the beach beneath the coastal pathway. The route shown on the map joins the green space near the public toilets and leads you back towards the village along a grassy pathway. The ground underneath is sandy, like a links golf course and seldom gets waterlogged (perfect in winter time when other grassy pathways are flooded).

View of Lambay – from the grassy area that runs parallel to the beach

Leave the grassy paths back at the slipway opposite The Old Golflinks, rejoining the Coastal path. Keep left at the triangular flower bed and walk past the tennis club on your right. Return to the Village Green via New Street.

Flower bed at Tennis Club – planted by Malahide Tidy Towns – Stay left on your return to the village

Please exercise care at all times near water. Check the weather and choose one of our other walks if conditions are not ideal.

Coast Path above Malahide Beach during an Easterly surge

This walk is not wheelchair accessible as part of it is on the beach.

Length: 4 km
Surface: Mix of paved paths, beach and grassy paths (good drainage after rain)
Footwear: Walking shoes / runners that you’re happy to use on a beach

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Posted in Active Travel, Community, CoronaVirus, COVID-19, Environment, Family, Footpaths, Fun, Pedestrians, Tidy Towns, Walks | 1 Comment

Malahide Family Friendly Bike Rides – Cycling for all ages

We all know that staying active, while maintaining social distance, is critical to our physical and mental health, especially during this challenging time.

To complement our series of Malahide Looped Walks, we’re publishing this series of “Malahide Family Friendly Bike Rides” mapped by our Active Travel sub-committee. By “Family Friendly”, we mean physically separated from traffic. These routes are suitable for all ages from 3 to 103 (Though route 3. Robswall park is a bit hilly).

Please remember – Paths within our parks and green spaces are “share with care”. When passing pedestrians from behind, let’s slow down, tinkle our bells from about 20 metres – smile and say hello..

1. Malahide Castle Perimeter – 4km loop – Mix of paved and crushed ash path

2. Estuary Park Seabury and Broadmeadow Estuary Path – 5km Mix of paved and sand path

3. Robswall Park loop (with “quiet streets” link to Malahide Castle) – 2.5km loop – paved

About the Active Travel sub-committee of Malahide Community Forum:

The Active Travel Sub Committee was set up in 2020 with a goal of improving walking & cycling facilities in Malahide, with a particular focus on the provision of “Safe Routes to Schools”. By improving the infrastructure to make it safe, residents of Malahide will be able to travel to local schools, parks, clubs and shops in a safe & healthy way, incorporating exercise into their daily routine. Click here for more details.

Among the ideas we’re exploring (for post pandemic implementation) is bringing “Cycling Without Age” to Malahide Castle. This wonderful initiative is already in place in St. Annes Park Raheny (See: https://www.loveclontarf.ie/news/cycling-without-age-clontarf-/ ).

If you have an interest in improving active travel in your street / area in Malahide, get in touch with the community forum at the email below.

 secretary.malahideforum@gmail.com

Posted in Active Travel, Climate Change, CoronaVirus, COVID-19, Cycle paths, Environment, Family, Family bike rides, Footpaths, Fun, Pedestrians, School Children, Schools, Transport, Youth | 4 Comments

Malahide Family Bike Rides: 3. Robswall Park

Robswall Park (with link to Malahide Castle) – Click for Details:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=1sSz97OlZcx3lOZGErtOyLxiWPi0rnC0U&usp=sharing

Welcome to the third in our series of Malahide family bike rides. You may view all our bike rides here. If you prefer walking – see our series of Malahide Looped Walks.

Please remember – Paths within our parks and green spaces are “share with care”. When passing pedestrians from behind, let’s slow down, tinkle our bells from about 20 metres – smile and say hello.

Family entering Robswall Park to walk, scoot and bike

Robswall Park (aka Paddy’s Hill) was opened to the public in 2007. The park connects the communities of Portmarnock and Malahide. Paddy’s Hill is the highest point in the park, with great views of Howth, Ireland’s eye and Lambay Island.

The Robswall Park bike ride is approx 2.5km long. In the map, we show it starting at the access point to Robswall Park from Jameson Orchard, which was opened in October 2019. This new path provides a crucial “active travel” route enabling schoolchildren from Robswall to more safely walk or bike to Malahide Community School, avoiding having to take the far longer route along the coast road and through the village.

You may enter Robswall park at any of 5 access points shown on the map, from Robswall estate (2 gates); Robswall playgound; Portmarnock (Limetree Avenue) or the Coast Road. Click into the map to see more details (to zoom in, see photos etc.).

Robswall Park Playground – with bike and car parking – located beside Gannon Park

Be aware – some of the paths in Robswall Park are hilly (they do lead to “Paddy’s Hill”) and can be challenging for young children, or for people using bikes without gears. Given the hilliness, please ensure that brakes are working well, that children know how to use their brakes, and do use them. Please cycle slowly and respect pedestrians’ right of way.

The hills are worth the effort, as the views are fabulous, changing each day with the weather and the light.

Notes:
1. You can bike from Robswall Park to Malahide Castle along “quiet streets (30kph zone)” of Jameson Orchard and Seamount Road – we’ve shown this as the amber line on the map. Be careful crossing The Hill and The Back Road which are busy with 50kph limits.

2. Robswall Park also provides a crucial “active travel” link between Malahide and Portmarnock. We’ve shown one of these routes in pink on the map – from Jameson Orchard to the Limetree Avenue gate in Portmarnock.

Route Details: Robswall Park Loop
Length: 2.5 km
Surface: Paved paths
Difficulty: Challenging for young children (hilly)
Segregation: Fully off-road

Route Details: Link from Malahide to Portmarnock (Jameson Orchard to Limetree Avenue)
Length: 900 metres
Surface: Paved paths
Difficulty: Challenging for young children (hilly)
Segregation: Fully off-road

Posted in Active Travel, Climate Change, Community, CoronaVirus, COVID-19, Cycle paths, Environment, Family, Family bike rides, Footpaths, Fun, Pedestrians, School Children, Schools, Tidy Towns, Youth | 1 Comment

Would you like your kids to be able to cycle safely to school?

The Active Travel Sub Committee of the Malahide Community Forum was set up in 2020 with a goal of improving walking & cycling facilities in Malahide, with a particular focus on the provision of “Safe Routes to Schools”. By improving the infrastructure to make it safe, residents of Malahide will be able to travel to local schools, parks, clubs and shops in a safe & healthy way.

The current walking and cycling infrastructure in the Malahide area is poor, which has led to many school children being driven to school, which in turn has led to gridlock at school drop-off and collection time.  

We believe that this should change as:

  • There is a substantial latent demand to cycle to school (In a recent NTA survey of 10,000 Irish school children,  only 507 cycled to school regularly, while if it were safe, 7,143 would cycle to school – see bar chart below)
  • Evidence shows that when routes are made safe, people cycle & walk 
NTA Bike Life Survey 2019 – view summary video at: https://youtu.be/NRxAtz_L6gY
  • A reduction in car use is good for people, society & the planet
  • There is a €1 net benefit for individuals and society for each kilometre cycled rather than driven (€170m per annum)
  • 20% of Ireland’s greenhouse gas emissions come from transport – cycling saved 28,000 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions which is the equivalent of 400,000 people flying from Dublin to London
NTA Bike Life Survey 2019 – view summary video at: https://youtu.be/NRxAtz_L6gY

Making cycling & walking safer for kids to get to school will increase these benefits 

While 24% of adults cycle once a week, a further 21% would cycle if facilities improved

NTA Bike Life Survey 2019 – view summary video at: https://youtu.be/NRxAtz_L6gY

Fingal County Council has set up a new Environment, Climate Action & Action Travel Department. We believe that by advocating for better facilities for Malahide & using our local knowledge we can improve the quality of life for our community.

Over the coming months we will be seeking the support of the community in our aim of achieving safe routes to school and if you have a particular interest in this area, why not get in touch with the community forum at the email below.

 secretary.malahideforum@gmail.com

Posted in Active Travel, Climate Change, Community, Cycle paths, Environment, Footpaths, Pedestrians, School Children, Schools, Tidy Towns, Transport, Walks, Youth | 1 Comment

Malahide looped walks – 8. Back Estuary, Seabury and Swords Rd

Back Estuary, Seabury and Swords Road. Click to view route details:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=1Um_GCG2wYSVLrFnmBfVsDsITdWglgI1R&usp=sharing

Welcome to the eight in our series of looped walks mapped by Stephen Macdonagh. See all Malahide Looped Walks.

This 7.8km walk starts in the village at the Bridgefield Car Park (Marked A). Proceed out of the village along the Dublin Road and turn right down Hanlon’s Lane to the Back or inner Estuary where you turn left to walk along the estuary.

Canoeist on Back Estuary at dusk
Swans on partially frozen Back (Inner) Estuary) – Jan 9th 2021

Walk west along the estuary (away from the village). Turn left at the Malahide Yacht Club and walk up Sea Road, past St. John Paul II school to the junction with the Yellow Walls road. Turn right at this junction and follow Old Yellow Walls road towards Seabury. Be careful crossing Barrack Bridge as the footpath is very narrow, making social distancing difficult.

Continue along Old Yellow Walls Road to the junction with Seabury Crescent where you turn left. You can access the Seabury green space shown in the map from any of the cul-de-sacs off Seabury Crescent. The map shows the first access point (from Seabury Drive, through Castle Cove – marked D). Walk along the path through the green that connects the Seabury and Killeen green spaces. Point E is the steps linking the green spaces.

Path connecting Seabury and Killeen Green spaces

Exit Killeen estate and turn left onto the Dublin Road. Turn left at “McAllisters’ Garage” and follow the Dublin Road back into the village.

For a longer walk, combine this route with the Abington, Streamstown and Castle walk. Please remember to share our paths roads and parks with care.

This walk is not currently wheelchair accessible due to the steps between Seabury and Killeen (Point E on the map).

Length: 7.8 km
Surface: Fully paved (with some steps)
Footwear: Walking shoes / runners (no need for hiking boots)
Wheelchair Friendly: No – due to steps between Seabury and Killeen

Posted in Active Travel, Community, CoronaVirus, COVID-19, Family, Footpaths, Fun, Pedestrians, Tidy Towns, Transport, Walks | 1 Comment

Malahide Family Bike Rides – 2. Estuary Park Seabury and Broadmeadow Estuary Path

Estuary Park Seabury and Broadmeadow Estuary Sand Path – Click for Details:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=1e7Jd3RfJXInl2Eeh6v5mEhcF4vE-xmfV&usp=sharing

Welcome to the second in our series of Malahide family bike rides. Enjoy! You may view all our bike rides here. If you prefer walking – see our series of Malahide Looped Walks. Please remember – Paths within our parks and green spaces are “share with care”. When passing pedestrians from behind, let’s slow down, tinkle our bells from about 20 metres – smile and say hello.

There’s a lovely short (approx 800 metres) “Share With Care” walking cycling path around Estuary Park Seabury – perfect for young children. Nice playground and exercise machines too. Lovely views of the estuary.  The residents of Malahide and especially those of Seabury have been campaigning for almost 20 years for a safe walking cycling route from Seabury to St. John Paul II’s primary school and onwards to the Dart station, Malahide Demesne and all other local amenities. The Active Travel subcommittee of the Malahide Community Forum is supporting residents and liaising with Fingal County Council regarding the provision of “Safe Routes to School & to local amenities”.

Estuary Park Seabury – Fairy Fort

A sand path (shown in yellow on the map) leads East from Estuary park to Caves Marsh and on to Barrack Bridge (Please exercise extreme care at the exit/access to Barrack Bridge, where there is no footpath and a busy road). Caves Marsh is a special area of conservation – please respect the nesting birdlife.

Caves Marsh Spring 2020 – Pair of Swans with Cygnets

Estuary Park connects to the west via a narrow path (shown in red on the map) to a lovely car-free sand/gravel path (a bit narrow at approx. 1.5m wide) along the Southern shore of the Broadmeadow Estuary. It runs for 1.6KM between Estuary Park and the roundabout junction with Seatown Road. This path is perfect for cycling with young children, as it is completely off-road. A great nature trail with lots of birdlife – expect to see herons, swans, ducks etc.

Broadmeadow Estuary Sand path – Stunning in October sunshine
Broadmeadow Estuary Path – 30 Dec 2020 – The path can get waterlogged after heavy rain

The good news: In August 2020, Fingalcoco obtained €1M in COVID Mobility funding to improve the cycling connection from Swords to Malahide. This 2.5km project will run from Seatown Road (Woodie’s roundabout) to the Estuary and then along Estuary Road to Seabury. The part of the route along the Estuary will require planning permission from An Bord Pleanala, due to the sensitive nature of the Estuary.

Route Details: Estuary Park Seabury:
Length: 0.8km (loop)
Surface: Paved path
Difficulty: Easy
Segregation: Fully off-road

Route Details: Broadmeadow Estuary Southern Shore Path:
Length: 1.6km (One way)
Surface: Sandy path
Difficulty: Easy
Segregation: Fully off-road (Exercise care accessing at either end)

Posted in Active Travel, Community, CoronaVirus, COVID-19, Cycle paths, Environment, Family, Footpaths, Fun, Tidy Towns, Transport, Youth | Comments Off on Malahide Family Bike Rides – 2. Estuary Park Seabury and Broadmeadow Estuary Path

Malahide Family Friendly Bike Rides – 1. Malahide Castle Perimeter

Santa is busy every year delivering bikes to children in Malahide and across the world

Santa delivers a new bike to practically every child in Ireland at some time in their childhood. Where can you go for a family friendly bike ride? Where can you relax knowing that little Mikey or Mollie can learn to ride their bike in safety.

Welcome to the first in our series of Malahide family friendly bike rides. Enjoy! You may view all our bike rides here. If you prefer walking – see our series of Malahide Looped Walks.

Please remember – Paths within our parks are “share with care”. When passing pedestrians from behind, let’s slow down, tinkle our bells from about 20 metres – smile and say hello.

Malahide Castle perimeter – share with care family bike ride – Click to view details:
https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=1iwnNg5Mow2hb8XBlyF8HXzpyCHmSCpIX&usp=sharing

The “Share with care” paths in Malahide Castle are the perfect place for a family friendly bike ride. At quiet times (you need to choose carefully), the coach car park, marked in pink, is a good place to teach kids how to ride a bike.

The perimeter path is just over 4k but there are many permutations and combinations in this wonderful facility. This route takes you through beautiful woods – with lots of places to stop and enjoy for the whole family.

Family walking and cycling in Malahide Demesne

Look out for the growing collection of carvings that are being added to all the time. See if you can find them…

Guarding the Castle

Length: 4 km (loop)
Surface: Mix of paved and crushed ash paths (good drainage after rain)
Difficulty: Easy
Segregation: Fully off-road (beware of some vehicles accessing car parks and making deliveries to Avoca etc. )

Posted in Active Travel, Community, Cycle paths, Footpaths, Fun, Tidy Towns, Transport | 1 Comment

Malahide Fairy Forts Trail

We’ve long known that Malahide is a magical place – now it’s official!

Fairies have set up home in a number of “fairy forts” in the Malahide area. The Active Travel sub-committee of the Malahide Community Forum has obtained photographs and mapped the location of the fairy forts (see below).

To date, forts have been located in Estuary Park (Seabury), Inbhir Ide, Hanlon’s Lane, Strand Court and The Back Road. If you’re aware of additional forts, please let us know.

Please don’t get too close to the forts (unless you have a gift for the fairies). Apparently one naughty child attempted to remove some of the fairies’ possessions – and the child hasn’t been seen since.

Malahide Fairy Forts Trail
Click to view details: https://www.google.com/maps/d/u/0/edit?mid=10GV3at1SiVUJPWUuCgpa64MuPYAvW1gv&usp=sharing
Estuary Park, Seabury
Inbhir Ide
Hanlon’s Lane
Strand Court
The Back Road

Up the airy mountain, Down the rushy glen,
We daren’t go a-hunting For fear of little men;
Wee folk, good folk, Trooping all together;
Green jacket, red cap, And white owl’s feather!
(From “The Fairies” – by William Allingham)

See maps of Malahide Looped Walks.

Length: Approx. 4K end to end (not a looped walk)
Surface: Fully paved – wheelchair accessible
Footwear: Ordinary footwear

Posted in Active Travel, Community, Footpaths, Fun, Pedestrians, Tidy Towns, Walks, Youth | 1 Comment